Community Gallery

Your Community Gallery

Launched in 2007, the BYTOWN MUSEUM Community Gallery program affords community groups, embassies, cultural organizations and local artists the opportunity to tell their stories within our walls. The Community Gallery – a unique Ottawa space located in the former cooper’s workshop, is an excellent venue to showcase the stories and perspectives of the diverse peoples that call Ottawa home. The Gallery has played host to a myriad of diverse exhibits from the likes of the: Polish Canadian Women’s Federation, the Ottawa Little Theatre, the Embassy of Guatemala, the Ottawa Valley Button Society and the Chinese-Canadian Arts Council, as well as local photographers Rémi Thériault and Graham Iddon to name a few.

We welcome all interested individuals, community and cultural groups, embassies and artists to fill out an application for the Program, or contact us directly for more information.

Please forward the following Call for Proposal Form to us once completed.

Grant Vogl 
Collections and Exhibitions Manager
grantvogl@bytownmuseum.ca
613-234-4570 x 222        

WHAT’S ON NOW 
Matthew Hinther: The Glebe is Overrated
Sept. 13 – Dec. 20, 2019

Artist Statement: “Born in Ottawa and raised on Fifth Avenue, I spent my youth playing in the streets and exploring the back alleys of the Glebe. It was a great community to grow up in. Forty three years on, the sense of community remains the same – and I’m still exploring. I present this series of photographs as a love letter to my neighbourhood.” – M. HINTHER.

Artist Bio: Matthew Hinther is a photographer based in Ottawa, Ontario. The majority of his work uses conventional film (as well as x-ray film) with a focus on 4x5in. and 8x10in. film formats. He also shoots in 35mm and medium format film. Hinther processes his black and white film using a developer that he mixes himself from instant coffee and other non-toxic household materials. He takes a traditional approach to photography, opting to shoot with large format view cameras. This approach is built from his belief that large format exemplifies the rudiments of photography; each photograph becomes a process that revitalizes the physical elements of film.